Roundup

  • There are fourteen new Segundo podcasts coming, which will include the bounteous audio recorded at APE and BEA. The first two are almost finished.
  • Richard Rorty is dead. There are remembrances from Dan Green and Christopher Shea.
  • Carlin Romano talks with John Updike, with Updike disturbing a pristine bar within minutes. Who knew that Schweppe’s could set Updike off? There’s also an abruptly engineered 12 minute podcast of the conversation.
  • Michael Redhilll gets a bit goofy about Roberto Bolaño.
  • Tom Bissell on Ryszard Kapuscinski.
  • Tao Lin: “if a novel called the statutory rape of dave eggers by al gore existed there would be less depression and loneliness in the world.”
  • Katherine Dunn is guesting at the inferior 4+1. To be clear, “inferior” is part of the name of the site. I need to bounce around like a Java-programmed jumping bean to see what the skinny is on this LiveJournal and can therefore not bandy about a modifier like “inferior” until I’ve examined the goods. All I know is that Dunn is there, and I remain curious if she will ever follow up Geek Love with another novel. These are the things, I suspect, a dutiful reader should put forward to a guest blogger. (via Gwenda)
  • Like Howard Junker, I too prefer John O’Hara to Frank.
  • Paul Collins on the Biotron.
  • Does Will Smith watch Woodstock? And will this prove disastrous as I, Robot? With Akiva Goldman mangling Richard Matheson, I think it’s a sure bet that the Will Smith Adapted Science Fiction Rule will hold: Under no circumstances should one see a science fiction movie adapted from a classic novel starring Will Smith and expect quality results.
  • Alcatras Versus the Evil Librarians.
  • There aren’t any decent book reviews in the blogosphere, did you say? Check out Colleen’s latest YA column.
  • Moonlight Ambulette: “And so he attempts to give this brief reading (the Accompanied Literary Society was somehow involved in the event) but of course it’s this loud, crowded room and no one is listening. Well, like 12 of us are listening. In the middle of rock bands! What a thing to do to a writer! So he reads about half a page from Wake Up, Sir, before he gives up and says, ‘You know what? Why doesn’t someone just come up here and paddle me with my own book? That would be less painful.’ And so someone does! A sunglasses-wearing lady appears out of no where and gleefully thwacks Jonathan Ames on the bottom with his own hardcover book. Again and again and again. And then she lets him spank her with the book, too.” Between boxing a much younger, albeit physically inept writer and attempting to read between bands (should he not know better in both cases?), I’m wondering what’s going on in Mr. Ames’ mind these days. (via Matthew Tiffany)
  • So here’s the question. Why weren’t podcasts represented in this panel?
  • Canadian author Rebecca Eckler is suing Judd Apatow for certain similarities between her book and Knocked Up. Apparently, both Eckler’s book and Apatow’s film contained a small appearance by Harold Ramis. Eckler has insisted that Ramis is funnier in Canada, despite the fact that Ramis was born in Chicago. Apatow has countered, pointing out that there have been several enjoyable mainstream comedies directed by Ramis in America and that Eckler needs to understand that Canadians often come to America in search of more fame and cash, and that this often comes at the expense of their edge. Ramis, thus far, has said nothing. We shall see how this all unfolds. (via Big Bad Book)
  • 100 Words That All High School Graduates Should Know. Dream a little dream.
  • The Shyness Reading List. (via Books, Words and Writing)
  • And the latest print hit piece on blogs? Joe Klein.
  • RIP Michael Hamburger.
  • Neil Gaiman on H.G. Wells.
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2 Comments

  1. Bolaño tends to produce that effect on people who have just discovered him. I witnessed the same reactions back in Chile when critics first noticed “The Savage Detectives” (Los Detectives Salvajes) and the rest of his output. As a matter of fact, this enthusiasm spawned a host of imitators in the Spanish-speaking world.

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